Distortion Pedals Canon City CO

In short, this rectangular black metal box contains two entirely independent distortion circuits that are fed by an internal splitter that separates them into high and low frequency bands; after their individual distortion treatment, the two bands are mixed back together at the output, to the user’s taste. Read on for more detailed information in the following article.

Cross Music Co
(719) 275-1075
623 Main St
Canon City, CO
Types of Instruments Sold
Band & Orchestral, Drums & Percussion, Guitars & Fretted Instruments, Print Music

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Tony Corona Wholesale
(303) 433-8980
10462 Santa Fe St
Northglenn, CO

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Lafayette Music
(303) 661-9335
1280 Centaur Village Dr Ste 10
Lafayette, CO
Types of Instruments Sold
Digital Piano, Print Music

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Charles Woods & Son Inc
(303) 457-2361
14929 Harrison St
Brighton, CO
Types of Instruments Sold
Acoustic Piano

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Grand Guitars
(970) 887-3928
Po Box 68
Granby, CO
Types of Instruments Sold
Recording Equipment, Guitars & Fretted Instruments

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Smashing Good Guitars
(719) 784-3730
128 E Main St
Florence, CO
Types of Instruments Sold
Guitars & Fretted Instruments

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Chris Finger Pianos
(303) 652-3110
Po Box 623
Niwot, CO
Types of Instruments Sold
Acoustic Piano

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JB Hart Music Company
(970) 242-9282
417 Main Street
Grand Junction, CO
 
Church Organs Of Colorado
(303) 349-5040
415 Violet St
Golden, CO
Types of Instruments Sold
Organs

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Great Divide Music
(970) 925-7492
111 S Monarch St
Aspen, CO

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First Impression: Roger Mayer Metalloid Dual Path Distortion

Ever since the dawn of the distortion pedal, manufacturers have taken a single-path approach to the job of generating filth. Meanwhile, in the studio, producers and engineers have long used dual-path techniques to record big guitar tones: the signal is split to two amps, or one amp and one DI, where different frequency ranges are EQ’d and treated independently before being blended back together to create the desired tone. Inspired by his days in the studio with Jimi Hendrix in the ’60s, as well as his work as a designer of high-end recording systems in the years that followed, Roger Mayer has applied this dual-path approach to a first in the pedal world, the UK-made Metalloid Dual Path Distortion ($319 retail/$269 street). http://www.guitarplayer.com/uploadedImages/guitarplayer/Stories/Metalloid.jpg

In short, this rectangular black metal box contains two entirely independent distortion circuits that are fed by an internal splitter that separates them into high and low frequency bands; after their individual distortion treatment, the two bands are mixed back together at the output, to the user’s taste. On the top face of the Metalliod, each band has its own Drive control to govern the distortion content, and an EQ control that’s individually tailored for its frequency range, and which determines the tonal emphasis within the band. The front edge of the enclosure carries controls for Mix and Output level. Here we also find the input jack, one jack for hard-wired (true bypass) output, two for buffered outputs, and a jack for 9V converter input, while a sliding panel on the driver’s-side edge conceals the easy-access battery compartment.

How do we approach this new concept in distortion generation? Mayer tells us, “Look at the Metalloid as two distinct distortion units side by side, acting on different parts of the guitar’s notes, then mixing them back together to form one sound. For example, the Low Band can control the bass string riffs for a tighter cleaner sound, while the High Band can be set for solo work as you move up the neck.” Tested with a Stratocaster, a Telecaster, and a Les Paul into a TopHat Club Royale MkII, I found the Metalloid worked brilliantly at doing exactly this: creating a big heavy-rock sound with firm, piano-like lows with just a hint of hair, married to sizzling, saturated highs. Reversing the settings makes for grungy low riffs with clear, jangling top strings, and there are countless gradations in between. Also, however you set each band, the balance between them that you select with the Mix control adds a further stage of tone shaping. At higher Drive settings the distortion character is gnarly and filthy, with a jagged, asymmetrical edge that really cuts through. With this knob anywhere past two o’clock it’s not for timid souls, but lower settings reveal a pedal that easily crafts blues and classic-rock lead tones in addition to its heavier distortion (the user’s manual suggests several starting points for different styles). All in all, the Metalloid demands extended experimentation if y...

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